Paris Metro arrives! – July 19, 1900

July 19, 1900

Paris Metro arrives!

The Paris metro (underground railway) opened today, almost 40 years after the world’s first system in London. Many of the stations are decorated in the popular Art Nouveau style. Some of the trains that will run on the Metro’s 192 km (119 miles) of track have rubber tyres, giving Parisian commuters an exceptionally smooth ride.

Paris Metro (Under Ground Railway)

Paris Metro (Under Ground Railway)

Paris’s is the second busiest metro system in Europe, after Moscow. It is one of the densest metro systems in the world, with 245 stations within 86.9 km2 (34 sq. mi) of the city of Paris. The first line opened without ceremony on 19 July 1900, during the World’s Fair (Exposition Universelle).

The Paris Metro consists of 300 stations on 16 lines covering the 10x10km area of central Paris. Metro lines are numbered from 1 to 14 with two “bis” or secondary lines 3b and 7b.

Metro Line Numbers, Paris

Metro Line Numbers, Paris

Each line has a color, which you’ll find on signs in the stations and on all the RATP maps. Connections between lines make your journey easy to plan. For an idea of your journey time, allow an average of 2 minutes per station and add 5 minutes for each connection.

Each line has two directions, indicated by the terminus station at each end. The different directions and connections are clearly displayed on blue and white signs on the platforms and in the tunnels. To be sure you’re heading in the right direction, check that your destination is on the list of stations just before you go down onto the platform. Inside the trains, you’ll find network maps and the detail of the line you’re on along with all available connections to other parts of the network.

Paris Metro (Under Ground Railway)

Paris Metro (Under Ground Railway)

Maps of the public transport network, in all shapes and sizes, are available free of charge at the ticket offices, as well as at the all the information centres of the Paris Convention and Visitors Bureau. Large-scale maps are also displayed on the platforms and at the entrance to each station.

Paris Metro arrives! – July 19, 1900http://i2.wp.com/plexusworld.com/wp-content/uploads/900px-Paris-subway-ligne5.jpg?fit=1024%2C1024http://i2.wp.com/plexusworld.com/wp-content/uploads/900px-Paris-subway-ligne5.jpg?resize=150%2C150 angelsujimeena Special Articles,,,,,,,,,,,,
July 19, 1900 Paris Metro arrives! The Paris metro (underground railway) opened today, almost 40 years after the world’s first system in London. Many of the stations are decorated in the popular Art Nouveau style. Some of the trains that will run on the Metro’s 192 km (119 miles) of track...
<span style="color: #ff6600;">July 19, 1900</span> <h2>Paris Metro arrives!</h2> The <strong>Paris metro (underground railway)</strong> opened today, almost 40 years after the world’s first system in London. Many of the stations are decorated in the popular Art Nouveau style. Some of the trains that will run on the Metro’s 192 km (119 miles) of track have rubber tyres, giving Parisian commuters an exceptionally smooth ride. Paris's is the second busiest <strong>metro system in Europe</strong>, after Moscow. It is one of the densest metro systems in the world, with 245 stations within 86.9 km<sup>2</sup> (34 sq. mi) of the city of Paris. The first line opened without ceremony on 19 July 1900, during the <strong>World's Fair (Exposition Universelle)</strong>. The <strong>Paris Metro</strong> consists of 300 stations on 16 lines covering the 10x10km area of central Paris. Metro lines are numbered from 1 to 14 with two “bis” or secondary lines 3b and 7b. Each line has a color, which you’ll find on signs in the stations and on all the RATP maps. Connections between lines make your journey easy to plan. For an idea of your journey time, <b>allow an average of 2 minutes per station</b> and add 5 minutes for each connection. Each line has two directions, indicated by the terminus station at each end. The different directions and connections are clearly displayed on blue and white signs on the platforms and in the tunnels. To be sure you’re heading in the right direction, check that your destination is on the list of stations just before you go down onto the platform. <b>Inside the trains, you’ll find network maps</b> and the detail of the line you’re on along with all available connections to other parts of the network. <b>Maps of the public transport network</b>, in all shapes and sizes, <b>are available free of charge at the ticket offices,</b> as well as at the all the information centres of the Paris Convention and Visitors Bureau. Large-scale maps are also displayed on the platforms and at the entrance to each station.